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The Mountain Chant: A Navajo Ceremony


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ORIGINAL TEXTS AND TRANSLATIONS OF SONGS, &C.

192. The songs of the dsilyídje qaçàl are very numerous and their recitation is governed by many rules, a few of which only have been discovered by the writer.

193. A list has been recorded of thirteen sets of songs which may properly be sung at night in the medicine lodge, When the ceremonies of the day are done, and in the corral on the last night, when there is no special song in progress pertaining to a particular alili or dance.

The list which follows exhibits the order in which these songs may be sung on any particular night. For example, if the singers begin with a song from set III, they cannot follow immediately with a song from sets I or II, but must select from some of the following sets, as set IV or V. Again, in each set the songs have a certain order of sequence which must not be reversed. For convenience these will be called

 

SONGS OF SEQUENCE.

Order

Indian name of set.

English name of set.

Number in each set

I.

Atsáleï Bigin

Songs of the First Dancers

16

II.

Tsintsò Bigin

Songs of the Great Stick, or Plumed Wand

12

III.

¢epè Bigin

Songs of the Mountain Sheep

12

IV.

I`¢nì` Bigin

Songs of the Lightning

12

V.

Tsilkè-¢igìni Bigin

Songs of the Holy Young Men

12

VI.

Tcikè-cac-nátlehi Bigin

Songs of Young Women Who Become Bears

16

VII.

Dsilyi` Neyáni Bigin

Songs of Reared Within the Mountains

8

VIII.

Tsáhagin

Awl songs

8

IX.

Nahikàï-gin

Whitening songs

8

X.

¢asàni Bigin

Songs of the Porcupines

7

XI.

Nanisè Bigin

Songs of the Plants

8

XII.

Tsin¢ilçòï Bigin

Songs of the Exploding Stick

26

XIII.

Yikàï-gin

Daylight songs

16

Total

161


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194. Besides those referred to in the above list, there are more which are appropriate to different acts in the ceremony, such as the songs sung at the obliteration of the pictures, at the building of the corral, at the departure of the akáninili, &e.

195. In some cases a number of songs in the same set are nearly alike; the addition or substitution of one verse, or even of one word, may be the only difference. Such songs usually follow one another in immediate succession; often, on the other hand, we find a great variety in subject and in style.

196. Some songs are self-explanatory or readily understood, but the greater number cannot be comprehended without a full knowledge of the mythology and of the symbolism to which they refer; they merely hint at mythic conceptions. Many contain archaic expressions, for which the shaman can assign a meaning, but whose etymology cannot now be learned; and some embody obsolete words whose meaning is lost even to the priesthood. There are many vocables known to be meaningless and recited merely to fill out the rhythm or to give a dignified length to the song. For the same reasons a meaningless syllable is often added or a significant syllable duplicated.

197. Other poetical licenses are taken, such as the omission of a syllable, the change of accent, the substitution of one vowel for another. The most familiar words are often distorted beyond recognition. For these various reasons the task of noting and translating these songs is one of considerable difficulty.

198. FIRST SONG OF THE FIRST DANCERS.

Qaniè qaò yaè, qaniè qaò yaè
Qaniè iè oayè oayè.

1. Qadjinäìa qaò yaè,
2. Kaç dsil ¢ilhyíli qaò yaè,
3. `Çaltsoï tsèë qaò yaè,
4. Cija cigèlgo qaò yaè.
    Náhi ìni èhi oayè, náhi ìni èhi oöhè.

5. Niqoyastcàdje qaò yaè,
6. Kaç dsil çolíji qaò yaè,
7. Kini bitsèë qaò yaè,
8. Cija cigèlgo qaò yaè.
    Náhi ìni, etc.

9. Qadjinäìa qaò yaè,
10. Kaç dsil litsòï qaò yaè,
11. Bitselitsòï qaò yaè,
12. Cija cigèlgo qaò yaè.
    Náhi ìni, etc.

13. Niqoyastcàdje qaò yaè,
14. Kaç dsil lakàie qaò yak,
15. A`a`i tsèe qaò yaè,
16. Cija cigèlgo qaò yaè.
    Náhi ìni, etc.

199. Translation.--1, 9. Qadjinàï, "Place-where-they-came-up," a locality in the San Juan Mountains where, according to their mythology, the Navajo emerged from the lower world to this. 5, 13. Niqoyastcàdje, another name for Qadjinàï. 2, 6, 10, 14. Kaç, now; dsil, mountain; ¢ilhyíli, black; çolíji, blue; litsòï, yellow; lakàie, white. These verses refer to four mountains surrounding Qadjinàï, which are designated by colors only to indicate their topographical positions. 3, 7, 11, 15. `Çalsoï = aça litsòï, "yellow wing," a large bird of prey; kini, hen hawk; bitselitsòï, "yellow tail," a bird of undetermined species; a`a`i, magpie; tse, a tall; bitse, its tail. 4, 8, 12, 16. Cija, my treasure; cigèl, my desideratum, my ultimatum, the only thing I


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will accept. When supposed to be said by a god, as in this song, it means the particular sacrifice which is appropriate to him. In this case probably the feathers spoken of are "cigèl" and the mountains "cija." The refrain "qaò yaè" is a poetic modification of qaa`, it looms up, or sticks up, said of some lofty object visible in the distance, whose base cannot be seen.

200. Free translation.

Place-whence-they-came-up looms up,
Now the black mountain looms up,
The tail of the " yellow wing" looms up,
My treasure, my sacrifice, loom up.

Laud-where-they-moved-out looms up,
Now the blue mountain looms up,
The tail of the hen-hawk looms up,
My treasure, my sacrifice, loom up.

Place-whence-they-came-up looms up,
Now the yellow mountain looms up,
The tail that is yellow looms up,
My treasure, my sacrifice, loom up.

Land-where-they-moved-out looms up,
Now the white mountain looms up,
The tail of the magpie looms up,
My treasure, my sacrifice, loom up.

201. FIRST SONG OF THE MOUNTAIN SHEEP.

1. Yiki ¢asizìni,
2. Kaç Tsilkè-¢igìni,
3. Kaç kátso-yisçàni,
4. Tsí¢a baälìli,
5. Bíja-ye¢igíngo.

6. Kaç Tcikè ¢igìni,
7. Kátsoye yisçàni,
8. Yiki ¢asizìni,
9. Tsí¢a baälìli,
10. Bíja-ye¢igíngo.

202. Translation.--1, 8. Yiki, upon it; ¢asizin, he stands on high. 2, 6. Kaç, now, tsilkè; young man; tcikè, young woman; ¢igìni, holy. 3. Kátso-yisçàn, the great plumed arrow; kátsoye yisçàn, with the great plumed arrow. 4, 9. Tsí¢a, truly, verily; baälìli, an alili, a show, a rite, or implement used in a dance for him. 5, 10. Bíja, his treasure, his special property, his peculiar belonging; ye, with, a prefix forming nouns which denote the means; ¢igíngo, positively holy or supernatural. Bíja-ye¢igíngo might be translated "charm" or "talisman."

203. Free translation.

He stands high upon it;
Now the Holy young Man [Young Woman, in Second stanza],
With the great plumed arrow,
Verily his own sacred implement,
His treasure, by virtue of which he is truly holy.

204. A reference to the myth and the description of the ceremonies will probably be sufficient to give the reader an understanding of this song. This set of songs, it is said, was first sung by the black sheep which stood on the rock as a sign to the Navajo fugitive; hence the name. (See paragraphs 35, 47, 48, 54.)

205. SIXTH SONG OF THE MOUNTAIN SHEEP.

Binaçoöláe (four times) oäyèhe oöhè.

1. Kaç Tsilkè-¢igìni,
2, Ca`bitlòli yèë,
3. Tsí¢a bialìli,
4. Bíja ye¢igíngo,
5. Binaçoöláe oäyèhe oöhè.

6. Kaç Tsilkè-¢igìni,
7. Natsilíçi yèë,
8. Tsí¢a bialìli,
9. Bíja ye¢igíngo,
10. Binaçoöláe oäyèhe oöhè.


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206. Translation.--1, 6. Kaç, now; tsilkè, young man; tcikè, young woman; ¢igìni, holy one, god or goddess. 2. Ca`bitlòl, Sunbeam, sunbeams; ye, with. 3, 8. Tsí¢a, verily; bialìli (paragraph 3), his dance or sacred implement. 4, 9. Bíja, his special property, his treasure; ye¢igíngo, that by means of which he is ¢igín, I. e., holy or supernatural. 5, 10. Binaçòla, it is encircled. 7. Natsiliç, the rainbow.

207. Free translation.

Now the Holy Young Man,
With the sunbeam,
Verily his own sacred implement,
His treasure which makes him holy,
Is encircled.

Now the Holy Young Woman,
With the rainbow,
Verily her own sacred implement,
Her treasure which makes her holy,
Is encircled.

208. Which is to say that the great plumed arrows which they bear are adorned with sunbeams and rainbows. They "shine in glory." (See references in paragraph 204.)

209. TWELFTH SONG OF THE MOUNTAIN SHEEP.

1. Nayunáni tcènia,
2. Kaç biçèïltsos tcènia,
3. Biqolçègo, tcènia.

4. Nayunáni tcènia,
5. Kaç biçènackòji tcènia,
6. Biqolçègo, tcènia.

210. Translation.--1, 4. Nayunáni, again on the other side, i. e., across two valleys. 2. Biçè, his horns; iltsos, slender; biçèïltsos, slender horns, i. e., the deer, by metonomy. 3, 6. Biqolçègo, it is becoming to him. 5. Biçè, his horns; nackòj, turgid, filled out, stuffed; biçènackòji, turgid horns--metonymically, the mountain sheep, Oris montana. The refrain, tcènia, he appears, he comes in sight.

211. Free translation.

Far beyond he appears;
Now "Slender Horn" appears.
His antlers are becoming. He appears.

Far beyond he appears;
Now "Turgid Horn" appears.
His horns are becoming. He appears.

212. This song, it is said, refers to the time when the prophet saw the vision of the black sheep on the rock. (Paragraph 35.) The reason for introducing the deer into the song is not obvious.

213. FIRST SONG OF THE THUNDER.

1. Çòna! Çòna! A`âîyèhe oöhè [repeat]
2, Yùçakoö ani`;
3. I`¢ai`djieë ani`;
4. Kos ¢ilhyíl biyì`dje,
5. Nàbizaç qolègo,
6. Çòna! Çòna! A`âîyèhe oöhè.

7. Çòna! Çòna! A`âîyèhe oöhè [repeat],
8. Yùyakoö ani`;
9. Anilçàni ani`;
10. Nánise biçqàko,
11. Nàbizaç qolègo,
12. Çòna! Çòna! A`âîyèhe oöhè.

214. Translation.--1, 6, 7, 12. Çòna, an imitation of the thunder, not a word. 2, 8. Yùçako, above; yùyako, below; ani`, any sound, the sound of the voice. 3. I`¢ai`dji, pertaining to the thunder. 4. Kos, cloud; ¢ilhyíl, black, dark; biyì`dje, within, or toward within it. 5, 11. Nàbizaç qolègo, again and again sounds his moving voice. 9. Anilçàni, a general name for large meadow grasshoppers.--10. Nánise, plants in general; biçqàko, in among them.


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215. Free translation.

Thonah! Thonah!
There is a voice above,
The voice of the thunder.
Within the dark cloud,
Again and again it sounds,
Thonah! Thonah!

Thonah! Thonah!
There is a voice below,
The voice of the grasshopper.
Among the plants,
Again and again it sounds,
Thonah! Thonah!

216. TWELFTH SONG OF THE THUNDER.

Aïena.
Beqojònigo ani`i [four times] oöhè.

1. Yùçakoö; ani`i;
2. I`¢ai`djieë ani`i;
3. Kos ¢ilhyíl biyì`dje,
4. Nàbizaç qolègo,
5. Beqojònigo ani`i, oöhè.

6. Yùyakoö ani`i;
7. Anilçàni ani`i;
8. Nánise biçqàko,
9. Nàbizaç qolègo,
10. Beqojònigo ani`i, oöhè.

217. Translation.-- Aïena, a meaningless beginning to many songs, which way be omitted. 1. Yùçako, above. 2. I`¢ai`dji, pertaining to the thunder. 3. Kos, cloud; ¢ilhyíl, dark; biyì`dje, within it. 4, 9. Nàbizaç his voice again, his voice repeated; qolègo, sounds along, sounds moving. 5, 10. (Be, a prefix forming nouns of the cause or instrument; qojòni, local or terrestrial beauty; go, a suffix to qualifying words); beqojònigo, productive of terrestrial beauty; ani`, a voice, a sound. 6. Yùyako, below. 7. Anilçàni, grasshopper. 8. Nánise, plants; biçqàko, in among thorn.

218. Free translation.

The voice that beautifies the land!
The voice above,
The voice of the thunder
Within the dark cloud
Again and again it sounds,
The voice that beautifies the land.

The voice that beautifies the land!
The voice below;
The voice of the grasshopper
Among the plants
Again and again it sounds,
The voice that beautifies the land.

219. FIRST SONG OF THE HOLY YOUNG MEN, OR YOUNG MEN GODS.

1. Oöc `çqa nagâîë,
2. Kaç Tsilkè-¢igìni,
3. Dsil ¢ilhyíl biyàgi,
4. Biyàji naïlè.

5. Aie `çqa nagâîë,
6. Kaç Tcikè-¢igìni,
7. Dsil çolíj biyàgi,
8. Biyàji naïlè.

220. Translation.--1, 5. `Çqa = biçqa, amid or among them; nagai, that, there. 2. Kaç, now; Tsilkè-¢igìni, Holy Young Man; Tcikè-¢igìni, Holy Young Woman. 3, 7. Dsil, mountain; ¢ilhyíl, black; çolíj, blue; biyàgi, at the foot of, at the base of. 4, 8. Biyàji, his child;. naïlè, he lays down, he leaves.

221. Free translation.

There amid [the mountains],
Now the Holy Young Man,
At the foot of the black mountain,
Lays down his child.

There amid [the mountains],
Now the Holy Young Woman,
At the foot of the blue mountain,
Lays down her child.

222. The characters of Tsilkè-¢igìni and Tcikè-¢igìni are in the myth. The black mountain pertains to the male, the blue to the female. Although not told with the rest of the myth, it was subsequently related to the writer that Tsilkè-¢igìni said to the prophet, "Whoever learns


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our songs will thenceforth be Our child." The above song, it is said, has some reference to this promise; but a fuller explanation, no doubt, remains to be discovered.

223. SIXTH SONG OF THE HOLY YOUNG MEN.

Aïena.
Altsàcië ¢igìni oöhè.

1. Altsàcië ¢igìni, altsàcië ¢igìni, altsàcië ¢igìni oöhè.
2. Kaç Tsilkè-¢igìni, bakàgië ¢igìni,
3. Dsil ¢ilhyíli eë, bakàgië ¢igìni,
4. Tsintsoï ¢ilhyíli e bakàgië ¢igìni,
5. Tsí¢a bialìli, bíja ye¢igíngo, bakàgië ¢igìni, oöhè.

Altsàcië ¢igìni oöhè.

6. Altsàcië ¢igìni, altsàcië ¢igìni, altsàcië ¢igìni oöhè.
7. Kaç Tcikè-¢igìni, bakàgië ¢igìni,
8. Dsil çolíji eë, bakàgië ¢igìni,
9. Tsintsoï çolíji, bakàgië ¢igìni,
10. Tsí¢a bialìli, bíja ye¢igíngo, bakàgië ¢igìni, oöhè.

224. Translation.--1, 6. Altsàcië, on each side; ¢igìni, a holy one, a god. 2, 7. Kaç, now; tsilkè, young man; tcikè, young woman; bakàgi, on the summit, on top of it. 3, 8. Dsil, mountain; ¢ilhyíl, dark, black; çolíji, blue. 4, 9. Tsintsoï, great stick, a notched stick used as a musical instrument in the dance. 5,. 10. Tsí¢a bialìli, truly his dance implement; bíja ye¢igíngo, his holy treasure, his talisman, his charm, his magic wand.

225. Free Translation

There's a god on each side.
Now the Holy Young Man
Is the god on top of the black mountain,
With his black notched stick,
The implement of his dance, his magic wand.

There's a god on each side.
Now the Holy Young Woman
Is the god on top of the blue mountain,
With her blue notched stick,
The implement of her dance, her magic wand.

226. This song is said to refer to that part of the myth where it is related that the prophet, flying from the Ute, climbed a hill which was transformed into a mountain. (Paragraph 38.) Each mountain was supposed to have a holy one on it, who could, by means of his notched stick, produce the metamorphosis. The mountains were not necessarily colored black and blue, but are thus described to indicate that they lay north and south of the prophet's path. (Paragraph 171.)

227. TWELFTH SONG OF THE HOLY YOUNG MEN.

Eâîèa qàla éla yaináhe oöhè.
Eâîèa qàla éla yainooò yaaà yooò [three times],
Eâîèa qàla éla yainà, qàla éla qainàhe oöhè.

1. Dsil ilhyíli inlòooò yaaà, yooò,
2. Tsintsoï ¢ilhyíli inlòooò yaaà yeeè.
3. Ci cigèlgo yainà,
    Qàla éla qainàhe oöhè.

4. Dsil çolíji inlòooò yaaà yooò,
5. Tsintsoï çolíji inlòooò yaaà, yeeè,
6. Ci cigèlgo yainà,
    Qàla éla qainàhe oöhè.

228. Translation.--1, 4. Dsil, mountain; ¢ilhyíl, black; çolíj, blue. 2,5. Tsintsò, a notched stick used in ceremonies to make music; inlo (inla`), they lie there (two long hard things lie). 3, 6. Cigèl, my ultimatum, my desideratum (said of the peculiar sacrifice which belongs to each god), something I (the god) will have and accept nothing in place of it, my special sacrifice.


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229. Free translation.

There lie the black mountains:
There lie the black sticks;
There lie my sacrifices.

There lie the blue mountains;
There lie the blue sticks;
There lie my sacrifices.

230. This is supposed to be a part of the instructions which the Holy Young Men and Holy Young Women gave to the prophet. The tsintso is made of cherry, which grows only on high mountains in the Navajo country. The sticks are painted black and blue. (See paragraph 171.) The song alludes to all these facts.

231. EIGHTH SONG OF THE YOUNG WOMEN WHO BECOME BEARS.

Ço¢igìni¢a oyàhe oöhè,
Ço¢igìni¢a oyà oyà ooyàya
    Hâîyàya hâîyàya hâîyàye, oöhè.

1. Kaç Tsilkè-¢igìnië; ço¢igìn¢a hâîyàhe, oöhè.
2. Bitsintsòië ië ço¢igìn¢a hâîyàhe, oöhè
3. Tsí¢a bialìlië; bíja-ye¢igìnië, oyà, oyà, oyàya,
    Hâîyàya hâîyàya hâîyàye, oöhè.

Ço¢igìni¢a oyàhe oöhè,
Ço¢igìni¢a oyà oyà ooyàya
    Hâîyàya hâîyàya hâîyàye, oöhè.

4. Kaç Tcikè-¢igìnië; ço¢igìn¢a hâîyàhe, oöhè.
5. Bitsintsòië ië ço¢igìn¢a hâîyàhe, oöhè
6. Tsí¢a bialìlië; bíja-ye¢igìnië, oyà, oyà, oyàya,
    Hâîyàya hâîyàya hâîyàye, oöhè.

232. Translation.-- Ço¢igìni¢a, ço¢igìn¢a, he is not a god; it is not holy; it is not divine. 1, 4. Kaç, now; tsilkè, young man; tcikè, young woman; ¢igìni, holy, supernatural. 2, 4. Bitsintsòi, his great notched stick. 3, 6. Tsí¢a, verily; bialìli, his implement of the dance or rite; bíja-ye¢igìni, his treasure which makes holy; his magic wand.

233. Free translation.

The Holy Young Man is not divine;
His great notched stick is not holy;
His magic wand is not holy.

The Holy Young Woman is not divine;
Her great notched stick is not holy;
Her magic wand is not holy.

234. This is supposed to refer to an altercation between these two gods, in which they tried to belittle each other.

235. I have another song of this series, in which the idea is conveyed that their powers depend on their magic wands or notched sticks.

236. ONE OF THE AWL SONGS.

Òwe òwe òwe yàni yàï owàn na a [repeat three times],
Owe òwe ìni áhe oöhè,

1. `Ke-cac-natlèhi natcagàhi,
2. Kaç dsil ¢ilhyíli bakàgi natcagàhi,
3. Kaç ni` inzàç inçì çoholnì¢a òna,
4. Kaç ni` inzàç inçì çoniò¢a òna.

5. Tcikè-¢igìni natcagàhi,
6. Dsil çolíji bakàgi natcagàhi,
7. Kaç ni` inzàç inçì çoholnì¢a òna,
8. Kaç ni` inzàç inçì çoniò¢a òna.

237. Translation.--Ke, an abbreviation of tcikè; Tcikè-cac-natlèhi, maiden who becomes a bear; natcagà', she travels far, she walks or wanders far around. 2. Kaç, now; dsil ¢ilhyíl, black mountain; bakàgi, on top of. 3, 4, 7, 8. Ni`, earth, land; inzàç, distant; inçì, it lies, it stretches; çoholnì¢a, seems not to be; çoniò¢a, not obscure or dint like a faint distance. 6. Dsil çolíji bakàgi, on top of the blue mountains.


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238. Free translation.

The Maid Who Becomes a Bear walks far around
On the black mountains, she walks far around.
Far spreads the land. It seems not far [to her].
Far spreads the land. It seems not dim [to her].

The Holy Young Woman walks far around
On the blue mountains, she walks far around.
Far spreads the land. It seems not far [to her].
Far spreads the land. It seems not dim [to her].

239. FIRST SONG OF THE EXPLODING STICK.

Aïena.
Aïeyà âîa aïeyà iè eè ieèe [three times] ië lan.

1. 'Ke-cac-nátlèhi dsilyi` ¢i¢ílkon ië nan,
2. Dsilyi` ¢olkòlkon; dsil bekonnìçe ië nan,
    Ië nan yahà hâîà ië nan aï.

3. Çabasçìni ço`yi` ¢i¢ílkon ië nan,
4. Ço`yi ¢olkòlkon; ço`bekonnìçe ië nan,
    Ië nan yahà hâîà ië nan aï,

240. Translation.--1,3. 'Ke-cac-natlèhi = Tcikè-cac-natlèhi, Young Woman Who Becomes a Bear; Çabasçìn, the Otter; ¢i¢ílkon, he or she set on fire in many places. 2, 4. Dsil, mountains; dsilyi`, in the mountains; ço`, water, waters. ço`yi`, in the waters; ¢olkòlkon, he set on fire as he went along; bekonnìçe, its fires in a line, its string of fires.

241. Free translation.

Young Woman Who Becomes a Bear set fire in the mountains
In many places; as she journeyed on
There was a line of burning mountains.

The Otter set fire in the waters
In many places; as he journeyed on
There was a line of burning waters.

242. It is related that in the ancient days, during a year of great drought, these holy ones, on their way to a council of the gods, set fire to the mountains and the waters. The smoke arose in great clouds, from which rain descended on the parched land. The song alludes to this legend.

243. LAST SONG OF THE EXPLODING STICK.

Hiè ieeè naâîà i a ai an an [twice] ie.

1. Tcikè-cac-nátlehië ¢igìni qayikàlgo; bàniya âîè.
2. Dsil aga ¢azàgië ¢igìni qayikàlgo; bàniya âîè.
3. Tsí¢a ci cigèliye ¢igìni qayikàlgo; bàniya âîè.
4. Yàne ¢oölànegoö ¢isitsaàye.
    Hiè ieeè naâîà, etc.

5. Kaç Tcikè-¢igìni ¢igìni qayikàlgo; bàniya âîè.
6. Kos aga ¢azàgië ¢igìni qayikàlgo; bàniya âîè.
7. Tsí¢a ci cigèliye ¢igìni qayikàlgo; bàniya âîè.
8. Yàne ¢oölànegoö ¢isitsaàye.
    Hiè ieeè naâîà, etc.

244. Translation.--1,5. Tcikè-cac-nátlehi, young Woman Who Becomes a Bear; Tcikè-¢igìni, Holy Young Woman, or young woman goddess; ¢igìni qayikàl, she journeyed seeking the gods; bàniya, she found them, she met them. 2, 6. Dsil, mountains; kos, clouds; aga, peak, summit; ¢azà`, many pointing upwards; (dsil aga ¢azàgi, on many mountain peaks). 3,7. Tsí¢a, truly or true; cigèl, my desideratum, my special sacrifice. 4, 8. ¢oölàne = ¢oölà¢a, some one does not believe it; ¢isitsà I have heard; yàne and other vocables are meaningless.


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245. Free translation.

Maid Who Becomes a Bear sought the gods and found them;
On the high mountain peaks she sought the gods and found them;
Truly with my sacrifice she sought the gods and found them.
Somebody doubts it, so I have heard.

Holy Young Woman sought the gods and found them;
On the summits of the clouds she sought the gods and found them;
Truly with my sacrifice she sought the gods and found them.
Somebody doubts it, so I have heard.

246. These songs are accompanied, in beating the drum, with a peculiar sharp strike like a sudden outburst or explosion. Hence, they say, the name, Tsin¢ilçòï Bigin.

247. FIRST DAYLIGHT SONG.

Çahiz¢ìle, çahiz¢ìle, ya ahâîà, lan [four times].

1. Kaç Yikâî-acikè çahiz¢ìle, ya ahâîà lan,
2. Qaïyolkàl¢e çahiz¢ìle, ya ahâîà lan,
3. Bitsídje yolkàlgo çahiz¢ìle, ya ahâîà lan,
4. Bikèc¢e yolkàlgo çahiz¢ìle, ya ahâîà lan.
5. Bitsídje qojògo çahiz¢ìle, ya ahâîà lan,
6. Bikèc¢e qojògo çahiz¢ìle, ya ahâîà lan,

7. Bizàç¢e qojògo çahiz¢ìle, ya ahâîà lan.
    Çahiz¢ìle, çahiz¢ìle, etc.
8. Kaç yikâî-açèç, çahiz¢ìle, ya ahâîà lan,
9. Naqotsòï¢e çahiz¢ìle, ya ahâîà lan.

    [Verses 3 to 7 are here repeated.]
        Çahiz¢ìle, çahiz¢ìle, etc.

248. Translation.-- Çahiz¢ìle = çahiz¢el, it hangs as a curtain or festoon; it hangs supported at both ends, i. c., the white curtain of dawn so hangs. 1. Yikâî-acikè the Daylight Boy, the Navajo dawn god. 2. Qayolkàl¢e, from the place of dawn. 3. Bitsídje, before him; yolkàlgo, as it dawns, as the night passes away. 4. Bikèc¢e, from behind him. Qojògo, in a beautiful (earthly) manner. 7. Bizàç¢e, from his voice. 8. Yikâî-açèç, the Daylight Girl-the dawn goddess. 9. Naqotsòï¢e, from the land of yellow light (horizontal terrestrial yellow).

249. Free translation.

The curtain of daybreak is hanging,
The Daylight Boy (it is hanging),
From the land of day it is hanging;
Before him, as it dawns, it is hanging;
Behind him, as it dawns, it is hanging.
Before him, in beauty, it is hanging;

Behind him, in beauty, it is hanging;
From his voice, in beauty, it is hanging.

The Daylight Girl (it is hanging),
From the land of yellow light, it is hanging, &c. (substituting her for him and his).

250. LAST DAYLIGHT SONG.

Loleyèe, Loleyèe.    Loleyèe, Loleyèe.
Loleyèe, Loleyèe.    Yahâièe qanaâî.

1. Qayolkàgo, Loleyèe.
2. Kaç Yikâî-acikèe. Loleyèe.
    Loleyèe, Loleyèe. Yahâièe qanaâî.

3. Kaç a¢a yiskàgo.    Loleyèe.
4. Kaç Yikâî-açèçe.    Loleyèe.
    Loleyèe, Loleyèe. Yahâièe qanaâî.

251. Translation.--1. Qayolkàgo, in the place of dawn. 2, 4. Yikâî-acikè and Yikâî-açèç, Daylight Boy and Daylight Girl (see paragraph 248). 3. A¢a yiskàgo, it is day all around. Refrain, loleyè, lullaby, a meaningless expression, to indicate sleepiness.

252. Free translation.

Lullaby, lullaby.
It is daybreak. Lullaby.
Now comes the Daylight Boy. Lullaby.

Now it is day. Lullaby.
Now comes the Daylight Girl. Lullaby.


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253. As the daylight songs are sung just at dawn, in the corral, before the dance ceases, their significance is apparent.


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